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Making a Public Comment

Council welcomes public comment before regular council meetings. Fill out the online form below for your chance to make a public comment at the next regular Monday Council meeting.  Please read the revised rules and procedures. (Public Comment will restart for the Sept. 9th Council Meeting.)

Registrations can also be submitted:

* In person at Cleveland City Hall, Room 220, 601 Lakeside Ave. NE. Paper forms are available to register.

* If you don't want to fill out the online form below, you can download this form and fill it out and email it to publiccomment@clevelandcitycouncil.org or drop it off at Council offices. (Parking at City Hall on the upper lot is free on Monday's after 5 pm when Council is meeting.)

Make a Comment in Person

 

Registrations to speak up to 3 minutes at a regular council meeting can be submitted between noon Wednesday and 2 pm on the Monday before a regular 7 pm council meeting. (Early, incomplete and false registrations are not accepted.) Only the first 10 are accepted.  


Make a Comment Online

 

If you don't want to speak at a Council meeting, please submit your written comments below. 


Public Comments

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Zionist Occupation Comments
Cleveland City Council needs to divest from Israel and denounce the blatant and disgusting genocide happening in Gaza. The people of Palestine should not be suffering, and these acts supported by our government are disgusting.
Name: Charlie DiFranco
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Posted: Oct 20, 2023
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Professional Soccer in Cleveland
Let there be NO public funding for professional soccer facilities or operations in Cleveland. Proponents are already setting the table for taxpayer handouts. Mayor Bibb and City Council are joining in the exuberance, as if any new entertainment, development or construction will actually benefit residents. As entertaining as these diversions can be, they DON'T necessarily bring a significant number of full-time, living-wage, family-sustaining jobs with benefits here. If these types of developments were truly economically beneficial to all residents, Cleveland wouldn't remain one of the poorest big cities in the United States. Our county, city and civic "leaders" need to get a grip on priorities: 1) poverty, 2) poverty and 3) poverty. Make progress there, and many other good things will fall into place. When everything is a priority, nothing is a priority. Our "leaders" are too scattered and running in six directions at once, and wasting time and money flitting around country and world pretending to be working. Professional soccer is a seductive distraction. Let its fans, boosters and investors carry the ball, and foot the bill. So, no taxpayer subsidies and no free or cheap land, no city backed low interest loans, no tax abatement and no TIF to private money-making schemes that just end up keep our poor people poor.
Name: Arthur Hargate
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Posted: Oct 19, 2023
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on the landlords not taking responsibility for the properties they own
The landlords do not live in Cleveland. They are hiring management companies to collect the rent. The management companies are not keeping the properties up, the tenants are allowed to do what they want to do. People like myself and numerous amount of other home owners have to suffer. We are part of the solution not the problem. We have been living in Slovac Village for a long time and we would like to live peaceably and clean. These people move in and wreak havoc for a short period time and then move and wreak havoc somewhere else. Meanwhile, anyone who is descent they will move if they are renting. Myself and plenty other home owners can not afford to move. We do not want try to move somewhere else and pay a whole lot of rent for something that is not as solid as our properties. These out-of-town landlords need to be more responsible for their properties. It is so hard to contact the real owners that is why they leave it up to the so-called management companies who truly do not care. Thank you Jackie Beckette
Name: jacqueline beckette
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Posted: Oct 18, 2023
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Support Palestine
Mayor Bibb and other city council reps or officials that publicly support Israel and its war crimes are way off base. Stop supporting Apartheid Israel and what is described as genocide on the Palestinian people.
Name: Don Bryant
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Posted: Oct 18, 2023
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CCA
It is archiac, cumbersome, and mind boggling that individuals who work in Cleveland but reside in another city cannot efile their CCA taxes like residents of Cleveland can. While it's a small example, it's representative of how challenging it is to do business in Cleveland. I voluntarily come to my office in downtown Cleveland but it's headaches and barriers like this that make working from home seem much more attractive (and cheaper, given I also pay income tax to my city of residence).
Name: Julie Spaulding
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Posted: Oct 13, 2023
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New increased parking legislation
I read about the new rules being approved, including the increase to parking costs and possibility that parking may no longer be free on the weekends. The increase in costs is necessary, however, no longer offering free parking weekends is counterintuitive. Visiting downtown Cleveland is more accessible when there is available free parking on weekends. I disagree with Councilperson McCormack's comments that residents of downtown park their vehicles for the entire weekend, clogging up spaces. As a downtown resident, I can assure this council that a vast majority of downtown residents pay for a garage space. I feel that the benefit of free parking on weekends, such as offering accessible access to downtown Cleveland for outweighs the possible benefits. Respectfully Submitted, Josh Friedman W 9th Street Resident
Name: Joshua Friedman
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Posted: Sep 20, 2023
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Housing Department/Complaints Inspection
I moved into my property on June 14, 2023 to discover a number of health and safety violations. On June 15, a City Inspector with the Housing Departments Program conducted a complaints inspection; found numerous violations which he detailed in his report; and set a compliance deadline for July 6, 2023. During the City Inspector's reinspection on July 7, 2023, he found that many attempted repairs were unsatisfactory, if they were even attempted at all. Moreover, during this second inspection, even more health and safety violations were identified and a new compliance deadline was set for July 24, 2023. During the City Inspector's third inspection of the property on July 24, 2023 (for which I was not present), several items identified in the second inspection were removed even though no repair was attempted. Some violations persisted, and another new compliance deadline was set for August 14, 2023. I brought this to the City Inspector's attention on August 7, 2023, but I received no immediate response. However, no final inspection was completed and per the City Inspector's response on August 14, 2023: "the complaint has been closed due to the fact that all health and safety violations have been addressed." When I asked how this was determined, especially since no final inspection actually occurred, I eventually learned from the City Inspector: "Property manager emailed me pictures of repairs to remaining violations, pictures are in the complaint file #: [edited] as well as the emails I received from property manager. After receiving the pictures the complaint was closed, there were no other health and safety issues." On August 24, 2023 I asked Chief Housing Inspector Messina for a copy of the photos, as I could prove that these repairs were either not attempted or unsatisfactory, and that the violations still persisted, as well as new ones which we had discovered. Chief Housing Inspector Messina replied to me on August 24, 2023, "The inspector was recently there. [...] we will not come back out." The Complaint Inspections page of the City of Cleveland website states, "Complaint Inspections are an integral part of the housing program. It is the policy of the Inspectional Services Division to investigate all citizen complaints regarding potential violations of the Housing Code." As I have reported several times, there are outstanding and compounding violations that were identified during these complaint inspections, which include: 1. Original inspection date 6/15/23: #4 - Properly repair. OVEN DOOR INSULATION IS LOOSE AND FALLING OFF AND BOTTOM BAKE TRAY IS NOT SECURED AND UNLEVEL Section: 1351.23, 1369.02 Current concern - the oven door is not properly insulated and the exterior surfaces exceed 250 degrees F. Property manager informed us to replace it at our own cost on August 10, 2023. 2. Original inspection date 6/15/23: #11 - Properly caulk/seal at:. WINDOW UNIT SASH AT WINDOW FRAME AND PROVIDE SCREEN Section: 1351.23, 1369.02 Current concern - the window no longer closes to catch the lock latch, and we have an unsecured window on our first floor. 3. Original inspection date 6/15/23: #12 - Properly repair. LOOSE STEP TREADS, DAMAGED RISERS (REPAIRS ALREADY MADE ARE UNSATISFACTORY), AND FLOOR BOARDS AT TOP LANDING Section: 1351.23, 1369.02 Current concern - the second step tread is still broken and is getting worse. 4. Original inspection date 6/15/23: #15 - Repair/replace door to properly close. REPAIR DOOR JAMB AND REPLACE MISSING STRIKE PLATE Section: 1351.23, 1369.02 Current concern - the door jamb was never repaired as instructed 5. Original inspection date 7/7/23: #3 - Replace missing pull chain to light fixture. 's Section: 1351.20, 1369.09 Current concern - this work was not completed, there are still lights we can't turn off 6. Original inspection date 7/7/23: #7 - Replace damaged/missing area(s) of ceiling in a workmanlike manner. Area to be finished and painted to match existing ceiling.. CLOSE OFF OPEN SECTIONS WHERE 1ST FLOOR CAN BE SEEN Section: 1351.27, 1369.06 Current concern - this work was not completed, not all open sections were closed. 7. Original inspection date 7/7/23: #8 - Secure loose floor covering. CARPET Section: 1351.27, 1369.06 Current concern - no repair attempt was made, and problem is getting worse 8. Original inspection date 7/723: #15 - Replace damaged floor covering. OR REFINISH FLOOR (REPLACE MISSING FINISH TO FLOOR AT BARE WOOD) Section: 1351.27, 1369.06 Current concern - We keep cutting our feet on the floors. No repair attempted, informed by property manager on July 20, 2023 they will not repair at this time. 9. Original inspection date 7/7/23: #19 - Replace damaged floor covering. OR REFINISH FLOOR (REPLACE FINISH TO BARE WOOD) Section: 1351.27, 1369.06 Current concern - We keep cutting our feet on the floors. No repair attempted, informed by property manager on July 20, 2023 they will not repair at this time. 10. Originally identified on point of sale inspection - Garage. No work to address the garage has been completed since the removal of the tree on July 11, 2023. In addition to the outstanding violations, there are a few new concerns that we have: 1. The sink in the downstairs bathroom is about to collapse off the wall. We believe it was damaged by the property manager during the attempted repairs to the window in the same room. 2. The handrail to the basement is positioned too low to be effective, and it does not extend the full length of the stairs. 3. The floor in the 3rd floor bedroom south is in worse condition than the other rooms identified. Long splinters, broken boards, and large holes in the floor. 4. There is an active leak in the master bedroom ceiling. I am very frustrated by Chief Housing Inspector Messina's response that these issues are "aesthetic" when they clearly are far, far worse than that. Moreover, the taking as satisfactory evidence of the property manager's word that these repairs were complete and now the refusal to perform an inspection does not speak highly of the commitment "to investigate all citizen complaints regarding potential violations of the Housing Code." Moreover, as a result of these ongoing violations, the property managers are engaging in increasingly retaliatory behaviors, some of which are verbally and physically aggressive, which make us feel even more unsafe in our home. We reached out to the Housing Department to help us address these issues, but by ignoring them, it is contributing to this ongoing behavior.
Name: Benyamin C Haber
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Posted: Sep 5, 2023
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Traffic Safety Concern on Chester Ave
The eastmost beginng of Chester Ave connecting MLK Jr Rd and Euclid Ave is a westbound segment of a road that is very poorly designed: it has 3 entrance lanes (2 straight, 1 right turn) and 4 exit lanes, 3 of which are straight, the last one a right turn. In practice, a significant number of drivers who entered driving straight aiming at turning right to exit this segment of road will have to either drive across at least two lanes in a short time, or make a right turn at lane 3 (while lane 4 is the only right turn lane). The above practice poses a hazard on those turning right to enter intending on driving straight to leave. Additionally, the traffic light governing this segment's exit has a right-turn light. As a pedestrian, I am worried that turning right is still seen when the red light is on.
Name: W.P.
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Posted: Aug 30, 2023
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Cudell Commons Park Development Project
Does destroying 40 mature trees in the Cudell Commons Park urban neighborhood to make way for an elementary school constitute an assault on its residents? The tree canopy helps to protect urban residents from the dangerous effects of the climate crisis. We know the tree canopy can lower ground level temperatures considerably, by as much or more than 10 degrees F. We know the dangerous effects from the climate crisis preferentially target urban neighborhoods like Cudell, whose residents are in no position to endure the urban “heat-sink” effects of rising climate crisis temperatures, which are highly likely to get much worse. And we now know full well that the climate crisis is here. So it makes no sense that the tree canopy in this park will be substantially reduced, especially in an area where residents and elementary school age children will recreate and seek shelter from the unreasonably hot days we know are ahead. How is it that decisions were made to remove the protection those trees provide in Cudell Commons Park? Were those protections understood? If not, why not? Was the effect on residents of destroying the tree canopy understood and ignored or thought to be inconsequential? Would the same decisions have been made in any Cleveland neighborhood, or is Cudell somehow unique? The thinking behind the decision is not just breathtakingly illogical, given the climate crisis, but appears to be driven primarily by concerns about construction cost. What about the cost to the quality of life of neighborhood residents, elementary school children and park users, given that these urban residents will preferentially suffer the dangerous effects of the climate crisis? It indeed looks a lot like an assault on the Cudell neighborhood residents: removing protections they will desperately need to help withstand the dangerous effects of the climate crisis, and putting their health in more peril than it otherwise would be. Yet this development project process and its predictably contentious outcome is very typical of the way property development is done in Cleveland and helps explain why the protective tree canopy here has been devastated, especially in disinvested neighborhoods, and why the project to restore the tree canopy is so far behind schedule. This city just does not properly value its trees and their health benefits for neighborhood residents. Trees do require maintenance, and city budgets are constrained. And property development here is conceived, designed and accomplished with lowest possible cost as the primary driver, so resident needs and preferences tend to be given lip service, at best. Destroying mature trees is the easy and least cost option for development, despite the many health benefits mature trees provide to the people that live, work and play near an urban green-space like Cudell Commons Park. And, painfully, public engagement with transparency and detailed information comes so late in the development process, it’s hard or impossible for residents to have an impact on the project. One has to wonder if that’s intentional. Because this development scenario repeats itself again and again throughout the city. Property development processes are opaque, inscrutable and impenetrable to the lay public. The processes are shrouded in mystery and secrecy, with the public invited in only occasionally to see conceptual pretty pictures and hear meaningless sales pitches marketing flimflam. Key decisions are made early in the process behind closed doors without effective public knowledge, understanding and input. Official meetings at the city are held when people have to work, and public comment is highly constrained. Then, at the 11th hour, the neighborhood gets a data dump about what is about to happen to it, and is asked for its opinion, which will have zero practical effect on the project. Over and over the bureaucratically esoteric, development-centric, tone-deaf, top-down, inequitable process repeats itself. And when the community routinely reacts with outrage at the manner with which they have been disrespected, misled and ultimately bullied, development proponents react with indignation, attacking and blaming the neighborhood residents for being NIMBY’s, or for not paying attention, or not participating or not understanding the convoluted process whose effects they will be forced to live with in their neighborhood. Accuse the accuser. A very typical, reflexive and predictable bureaucratic misdirection used habitually by development project proponents in this city. But that’s the way property development is done in Cleveland, and that’s exactly what has happened in the Cudell Commons Park planning to build an elementary school. The project as proposed will destroy 40 mature trees that protect the public, and the neighborhood’s residents are quite understandably pushing back.
Name: Arthur Hargate
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Posted: Aug 29, 2023
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Neighborhood, side walk, business
The Walgreens in the corner Clark and Fulton are not taking care of the perimeter. The fence is completely destroyed. There is garbage all around it. The Stop sign (after the drive thru) is not even visible any more. I have contact the store manager multiple times and nothing happens. The residences have to deal with all the garbage from Walgreens. When Walgreens was being built they placed multiple trees on our side of the street. They would come and maintain them but with time they stopped. They are making the houses worst. There is no visibility at all because of the trees and all the garbage. There are usually people hiding in them either using drugs or hiding from employees after they were shoplifting. I have been a resident of the same area for over 20 years and it just gets worse and worse.
Name: Vazquez
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Posted: Aug 9, 2023
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