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Making a Public Comment

Council welcomes public comment. Fill out the online form below for your chance to make a public comment at the next regular Monday council meeting. Read the procedures for public comment.

Registrations can also be submitted:

* In person at Cleveland City Hall, Room 220, 601 Lakeside Ave. NE. Paper forms are available to register.

* If you don't want to fill out the online form below, you can download this form and fill it out and email it to publiccomment@clevelandcitycouncil.org or drop it off at Council offices. (Parking at City Hall on the upper lot is free on Monday's after 5 pm.)

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Public Comments

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State of the city address
Fuck you youre bullshit. Why in one of the most impoverished neighborhoods N Collinwood is the only grocery store with healthy food Daves Supermarket closing. Seriously where are our people gonna go now but to a gas station? I call shinanigans
Name: Harold j deboe
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Posted: Apr 21, 2022
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Existing Black Women Commission and Women Commission registerd name with the State of Obio.trade name and services
The City of Cleveland consideration of proper name for their pending newly found committe for Black Women. The Commission is taken and registered with the State of Ohio. Its proper to respect the name 9fvan already ecisting irganization, to do otherwise is politically disrespectful and a slippery slope of deceptive practice
Name: Kimberly F Brown
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Posted: Apr 20, 2022
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City Land Bank Disposition Policy
These are the comments, with links to resources, that I made at City Council on April 4, 2022: Cleveland City Council Public Comment, April 4, 2022 Land Bank Disposition Policy Contact Info: Marge Misak marge.misak@gmail.com 216-299-1641 Good evening. My name is Marge Misak. I’ve lived in the City of Cleveland for more than 30 years, and I directed the first community land trust here. In my current work, I provide technical assistance to the Franklin County Land Bank in Columbus as they develop a countywide community land trust. I’m here tonight to talk about what happens to land in our city, specifically, land that the city currently owns in the land bank. As council members, you are often asked to weigh in on decisions about land bank parcels. And Mayor Bibb has the intention of creating a Vacant Land Task Force to identify opportunities to – quote – “market, sell, and develop city-owned vacant lots throughout Cleveland.” I would like to suggest that, before creating a more efficient system for selling land bank lots, it’s critical that the city create an equitable policy. Such a policy would shine a light on our vision for an equitable future for all residents, especially those who are homeless or unaffordably housed. What might that take? First, know our history. We could look to Evanston, Illinois’ discrimination study that made the case for their reparations program for a good example of a historic look. Closer to home, the impact of foreclosures and abandonment have been well documented by the Vacant and Abandoned Property Action Council (VAPAC). Daniel Kerr’s book, Derelict Paradise, documents a longer history in Cleveland of urban development policies that led to displacement and homelessness. Then, what might an equitable land bank policy include? I’d like to suggest three good ideas and some places that have put them into practice: 1. First: Transition from a focus on ‘highest and best use’ to establishing criteria that prioritize neighborhoods and residents impacted by long term disinvestment and displacement. The Albany County Land Bank in New York did exactly that and has a good example of a process with those priorities. 2. Second: Prioritize land for permanently affordable housing development to address the critical shortage in the City of Cleveland, where it’s estimated that 9300 homeowners and more than 26,000 renters pay more than half their income on housing. The Atlanta Land Bank’s policies and procedures establish that priority and have followed it up – and tested it out in court – with an agreement with the Atlanta Land Trust. 3. And finally: Create a path to permanency for green space initiatives in the City of Cleveland, whether it’s for community gardens or community gathering spaces. Look to green space land trusts like those in Baltimore or Chicago for good examples. Thank you for your time and attention. I’d be happy to follow up on these issues. Resources Evanston Policies and Practices Directly Affecting the African American Community, 1900 - 1960 (and Present), 2019, https://www.cityofevanston.org/home/showpublisheddocument/59759/637382881295170000 Derelict Paradise: Homelessness and Urban Development in Cleveland, Ohio, by Daniel R. Kerr, 2011, https://www.umasspress.com/9781558498495/derelict-paradise/ Albany County Land Bank Corporation, Disposition of Real and Personal Property Policy, https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5947fe9a2994cac227744c26/t/6172cd7143237f304161d994/1634913649424/ACLB+Disposition+of+Real+and+Personal+Property+Policy+%28Adopted+October+2021%29.pdf Metro Atlanta Land Bank, Policies and Procedures, https://secureservercdn.net/104.238.71.33/v6z.7af.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Metro-Atlanta-Land-Bank-Programs.pdf and https://www.metroatlantalandbank.org/our-programs/#programs Atlanta Land Trust, https://atlantalandtrust.org/ Baltimore: Preserving Community-Managed Open Spaces, https://baltimoregreenspace.org/wp-content/downloads/CMOSguide_000.pdf Baltimore GreenSpace, https://baltimoregreenspace.org/ Chicago: NeighborSpace, http://neighbor-space.org/ Land Banks and Community Land Trusts: Partnering to Provide Equitable Housing Opportunities Now and for Future Generations, Kim Graziani, Center for Community Progress, 2021, https://communityprogress.org/publications/land-banks-and-community-land-trusts/
Name: Marge Misak
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Posted: Apr 6, 2022
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Fare Evasion Decriminalization
In 2020, City Council voted to declare racism a public health crisis. I want to bring to City Council's attention that the way our city handles fare evasion right now is an example of the systemic racism that we need to work against, as it disproportionally impacts black and brown residents. Arrests, fines, and jailtime are not the answer. Dropping fare evasion as a criminal offense is one big step towards addressing the crisis of racism in our city.
Name: Michael Harney
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Posted: Apr 4, 2022
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Arts Funding 2%
The arts have been hit particularly hard by the pandemic. The perception of the importance of our work has diminished significantly. The arts are an essential part of many different aspects of living, and not the non-essential businesses we have come so dangerously close to becoming. We have 16 different artists studios in Tower Press, the center of the Superior arts district. As a group, we still have not had the motivation to meet and begin scheduling our annual calendar of studio tours and exhibitions. In the past, Tower Press artists have been leaders, with the Campus District, and Downtown Cleveland Alliance, and others to insure the growth of the Superior Arts District! Please demonstrate your commitment to the arts by approving this small percentage of Covid relief funds to Cleveland's still struggling arts scene.
Name: Dan Morgan
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Posted: Mar 25, 2022
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Funding for the Arts in Cleveland
Nothing, and I mean nothing, makes a city more interesting than a healthy and happy arts community. Please consider the arts as a vital city asset just as you would sports, parks, or development companies. We need all the help we can get out here in order to keep this city's heart beating in a positive and educational way. Art saves lives. Barbara Merritt Owner 818 Studio Gallery in Tremont
Name: Barbara Merritt
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Posted: Mar 25, 2022
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Noise disturbance
The establishments on West 25th Street are extremely loud. In particular Market Garden Brewery. They turn their outdoor speakers on at night and blast loud music. This is disturbing to those of us who live in the area. I can hear this even if my doors and windows are closed. I can even hear it above other noise in my own place. It also disturbs my sleep at night. I was told by Heather (manager) that the owners are the ones who demand the outdoor speakers be turned on and up so loud. This needs addressed! This is not only an area of business, but real people live here.
Name: Natasha
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Posted: Mar 19, 2022
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Potholes, Dumping, Street Crossing (Its not safe)
I am a resident of the Collinwood/Nottingham area. The street that is problematic is East 166th Street off of St. Clair. Despite the threat of being watched, dumping has begun again on this street. The street is also riddled with potholes. I am a frequent rider of the RTA Paratransit. They are routed to that street by their GPS; traveling down that street results in hard bumping for the passengers. I had suffered aggravation in my shoulder and back area from such rugged riding . Pain is costly; trying to relieve the discomfort cost me almost $50. I am a person dealing with a disability and is on a fixed income and an expense like this is a hard hit. There is sidewalk safety for me as a person who uses a mobility aid. The sidewalk near the beginning of the northbound side of the street makes it necessary to take the dangerous option of walking in the street. Using public transportation is a hazardous task if the need is to go in the westbound direction. there is no safe way to cross the street. Between the areas of Holmes/London and St. Clair and the next light at Hannah Gibbons School, is treated as a free for all roadway. Pedestrians find it hard to cross the street and impossible for someone who is disabled. There is option to access the other side of the street due to there only being sidewalks that you have to step down. Taking the chance that traffic will chivalrous is a dice game. There should be a a crossing area equipped with a caution light for crossing pedestrians in my opinion. Ever since the traffic lights have been removed, St. Clair has become almost impossible to cross. I am probably not the only resident to have this opinion but they may be capable of walking unaided, I am not. There are three to four passengers who only option is to use the Paratransit service provided by RTA or ride share services.
Name: Felicia Little
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Posted: Mar 7, 2022
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Section 115
I thank you for your work as members of city council. I trust you will take every step possible to support your constituents who live in your wards over corporate interests and perpetrators of misinformation that spreads unfounded fears. I am concerned that city Council is considering inadequate funding of the law department for charter section 115. This is the statute written into law after Clevelanders strongly supported Issue 24 in the November election. Mayor Bibb’s proposed budget fully funds this work necessary for police accountability and I call on Council to approve that budget item at the full funding level. Certainly expenses are a concern to fiscal management of city funds, but I would like my tax dollars to go towards police accountability to put an end to police violence perpetrated on our citizens rather than law suits due to police misconduct. Section 115 also provides for grants to organizations who can offer alternatives to policing which really work. Therefore these would be more fiscally responsible and improve Clevelanders’ wellbeing and the health and vibrancy of our great city. Thank you for your commitment to Cleveland, Jennifer Blakeney
Name: Jennifer Blakeney
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Posted: Mar 7, 2022
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CWRU/ UCI Police Jurisdiction Expansion
As a current student at Case Western Reserve University, I am writing to speak out against Items 210/211 in relation to the expansion of CWRU and UCI Police into Little Italy and Ashbury. Just a few months ago, Issue 24, a ballot initiative, was passed in order to allow for effective community oversight over the Cleveland Police Department. The reason this was needed in the first place was due to an extensive history of police misconduct in the city. Issue 24 was voted on by the majority of Cleveland voters, showing clear concern and a need for this oversight and accountability. CWRU students were not told at all about this measure and have not been included in the conversation. Since this directly impacts us and the communities surrounding us, I strongly believe that this expansion should not happen without more dialogue with the community as well as consideration of the implications it has coming so soon after the passing of Issue 24.
Name: Julia Kocherzat
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Posted: Mar 1, 2022
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